Sheela-na-Gig aka Jeanne Rathbone

Lanesborough Hotel, Rosewood Hotel and St Pancras Hotel indulgent visits

Posted in St. Pancras and Rosewood Hotels by sheelanagigcomedienne on November 12, 2013

I visited the family of Phoebe who was 97 in St Mary Cray on a wet Friday in November. On my way back I dropped into The Lanesborough Hotel which was formerly St. George’s Hospital at Hyde Park Corner and now a 5* hotel and I had a pot of tea in the Library bar which was served with hot milk which I reckon is a good idea. The chunky biscuits were delicious.

Lanesborough Hotel Entrance Hyde Park

Lanesborough Hotel Entrance Hyde Park

Library bar Lanesborough Hotel

Library bar Lanesborough Hotel

St George’s Hospital opened in the original Lanesborough House in 1733. By the 1800s the hospital was falling into disrepair. Lanesborough House was demolished to make way for a new 350-bed facility. Building began in 1827 under architect  William Wilkins. The new hospital was operational by 1844, serving continuously as a hospital until transferred to Tooting, south London  in the 1970s, leaving the Hyde Park Corner premises vacant in 1980. Rosewood Hotels and resorts refurbished and re-opened the building as a hotel in 1991. Ten years later the management contract passed to Starwood’s St Regis operation as its first and only hotel in England. It is one of the most expensive hotels in London.Lanesborough the_westminster_square

Lanesborough Dining

Lanesborough Dining

In 2009, The Lanesborough announced the launch of ‘Apsleys – a Heinz Beck Restaurant’. This is Chef Heinz Beck’s first restaurant outside Italy. Beck has been the recipient of numerous awards for outstanding achievement throughout a long and prestigious career. He was awarded three-Michelin stars for his cuisine at La Pergola in Rome, Italy. ‘Apsleys – a Heinz Beck Restaurant’ began service on September 7, 2009, and was awarded its first michelin star. This is the current fastest time for a new London restaurant to get one, in fewer than 5 months. Aspley House opposite  the Lanesborough was the home of the Duke of Wellington.

 

I do enjoy popping into these luxury hotels especially after work be it a family visit, a funeral or a meeting.

I attended our annual SACRE ( Standing Advisory Committee on Religious Education) representatives meeting at Conway Hall recently and afterwards dropped in to the bar at the newly refurbished Rosewood Hotel formerly the Pearl Assurance Company.

Rosewood Hotel Holborn

Rosewood Hotel Holborn

Rosewood London is a grand Edwardian edifice. The hotel is situated in one of the capital’s most historic thoroughfares, High Holborn, a road that dates back to Roman times. The Manor of Holborn was mentioned in 1086 in the Domesday Book, a land survey, and through the Middle Ages, as the City of London developed, the district took on an increasingly significant role. During the 14th and 15th centuries, the Inns of Court were founded nearby, establishing the district as the centre of the British legal profession.

As the district grew in importance, so too did its residents. Former Holborn occupants include Sir Francis Bacon, Sir Thomas More, John Milton, Samuel Johnson and Charles Dickens. Dickens wrote Pickwick Papers while living here, and set scenes from many novels in the area, including Pip and Herbert Pocket’s home in Great Expectations. As the 20th century approached, the area was home to William Morris and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, as well as the Holborn Restaurant, an expansive eatery (it was formerly a casino) that the 1890 Baedeker’s guide to London called one of the best-known restaurants in the city.

History of No. 252 Designed by H. Percy Monckton in a flamboyant Edwardian style, the extraordinary building at 252 High Holborn began construction in 1912. The first part was completed in 1914, and it was expanded upon in four stages over nearly 50 years, during which time it was the headquarters for the Pearl Assurance Company.

Rosewood Hotel Lobby

Rosewood Hotel Lobby

The subsequent transformation of this historic building from Imperial-era offices into a London luxury hotel was carried out under the guidance of English Heritage, which lists the principal facades, as well as the interiors of the former East and West Banking Halls (now Holborn Dining Room and the Bar, respectively) and the Grand Staircase as the hotel’s significant heritage features.

The magnificent street frontage, which today is the entrance to Rosewood London, features a central carriageway entrance and dome leading into a grand courtyard, which provides a calm sanctuary away from the bustle of the city.

Rosewood Hotel corridor

Rosewood Hotel corridor

Inside, the lavish interiors are fitted out with Cuban mahogany and seven types of marble, including extremely rare types such as Swedish Green and Statuary. One of the most dramatic features of this five-star heritage hotel is the Renaissance-style seven-storey grand staircase, an architectural tour de force in marble. It ascends from either side of the entrance on High Holborn, forming a bridge on the first floor and rising through all the floors under an elliptical dome. Looking upwards, the arcades of Pavonazzo marble frame a view of the cupola that rises to 50.6 meters (166 feet), the maximum permitted height at the time of construction. Three individual heritage boardrooms are named in honour of Chairmen of Pearl Assurance Company. The Grade II-listed building is now sensitively renovated throughout to provide accommodation with the feel of a stylish London residence. The bar was cosy.

Rosewood Hotel bar

Rosewood Hotel bar

ST PANCRAS HOTEL  Next up is the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel formerly the Midland.

St pancras exterior

Gilbert Scott bar entrance to St Pancras Hotel

 

I had a drink in the Gilbert Scott Bar and walked through to the foyer passing the magnificent staircase which leads on to the Booking Hall bar – all very sumptu0us.

 

Gilbert Scott bar

Gilbert Scott bar

Lobby bar St Pancras Hotel

Lobby bar St Pancras Hotel

Sir John Betjeman was instrumental in the campaign to save St Pancras station from demolition. He was founding member of the Victorian Society and a dedicated campaigner and was commemorated when it became an international terminus for  Eurostar in November 2007. He called the plan to demolish St Pancras a “criminal folly”.
Betjeman and bag statue

Betjeman and bag statue

Kissing couple at St Pancras saying Goodbye

Kissing couple at St Pancras saying Goodbye

Booking Hall bar exterior

Booking Hall bar exterior


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About it he wrote, “What [the Londoner] sees in his mind’s eye is that cluster of towers and pinnacles seen from Pentonville Hill and outlined against a foggy sunset, and the great arc of Barlow’s train shed gaping to devour incoming engines, and the sudden burst of exuberant Gothic, the hotel seen from gloomy Judd Street.”

Magnificent Staircase

St Pancras stairwaystairs up st pancrasstairway st pancras

 

 

 

 

 

st-pancras-renaissance-hotel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do treat yourself to a visit to the St. Pancras Hotel and it is a great place to meet friends and to show to visitors to this great city.

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